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| Last Updated: 14/06/2024

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World Diabetes Day 2022

Key Facts about Diabetes

 

  • ·         The number of people with diabetes rose from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014. Prevalence has been rising more rapidly in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income countries.
  • ·         Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation.
  • ·         Between 2000 and 2019, there was a 3% increase in diabetes mortality rates by age.
  • ·         In 2019, diabetes and kidney disease due to diabetes caused an estimated 2 million deaths.
  • ·         A healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.
  • ·         Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications.

 

History

 

World Diabetes Day (WDD) was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. It is marked every year on 14 November, the birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, who co-discovered insulin along with Charles Best in 1922. WDD is the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign reaching a global audience of over 1 billion people in more than 160 countries. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public and political spotlight. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted in 2007 after the passage of the UN Resolution on diabetes. The blue circle is the global symbol for diabetes awareness. It signifies the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes epidemic. Every year, the World Diabetes Day campaign focuses on a dedicated theme that runs for one or more years. The theme for World Diabetes Day 2021-23 is Access to Diabetes Care. The theme for this year is ‘access to diabetes education’, underpins the larger multi-year theme of 'access to care'. In the lead-up to and on 14 November, WHO will highlight not only the challenges, but more importantly the solutions, to scaling-up access to diabetes medicines and care. WHO's World Diabetes Day activities will cover issues ranging from championing the priorities of people living with diabetes in advocacy to the Global Diabetes Compact, which drives efforts globally to reduce the risk of diabetes and ensure access to treatment and care. The World Diabetes Day campaign aims to be the: (i) Platform to promote IDF advocacy efforts throughout the year (ii) Global driver to promote the importance of taking coordinated and concerted actions to confront diabetes as a critical global health issue.

 

The number of people with diabetes has nearly quadrupled since 1980. Prevalence is increasing worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The causes are complex, but the rise is due in part to increases in the number of people who are overweight, including an increase in obesity, and in a widespread lack of physical activity. Diabetes of all types can lead to complications in many parts of the body and increase the risk of dying prematurely. In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths globally. A large proportion of diabetes and its complications can be prevented by a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use. In April 2016, WHO published the Global report on diabetes, which calls for action to reduce exposure to the known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to improve access to and quality of care for people with all forms of diabetes.

 

References:

·         https://www.who.int/news-room/facts-in-pictures/detail/diabetes

·         https://worlddiabetesday.org/